Sunday, August 27, 2017

Alena Chapman on How to Break Free from Unhappiness and Have Abundance & Joy in Life

Alena Chapman talks to Alexander “The Engineer” Lim, host of AuthorStory by about her book, The Prison Effect: Discover How You Are Blocking Your Own Happiness and Break Free to Abundance and Joy in Life.

“You never, ever know the awesome life you can have if you don’t try to have an awesome life, and all it takes is trying.” ~Alena Chapman

People have coined Alena as “the Master Manifester,” as a reflection of her ability to manifest things in her life, and she admits that she wasn’t always a master manifester, as she had been in her own prison. It got to the point where she stopped at a country road and told the Universe that she wanted a happy life and wanted it now, with the intention to have just that, and things started happening from there, with people coming in whom she needed at the time. She became so involved with manifesting that she taught everyone she could, initially in her hometown, and she remarked that those whom she taught began having happier lives. This made her realize that she needed to get her message out into the greater public, hence her writing the book.

Alena remarked that The Prison Effect contains the tools she used to create her life, and at the beginning of the book is included a chart which people can use to pinpoint where they are in their lives, where happiness or unhappiness is concerned. She then noted that people, once they know where they are, now have a choice whether to stay where they are or move on to the happiness that they are bound to be seeking. Alena then gave the example of, after dropping her kids off at school, meeting with other mothers to complain, which then carried into her day and showed up as her not feeling excited or being present to such things as the beauty of the day. She then remarked that it takes a wake-up call, when one truly notices that there is nothing positive in one’s day, for people to actually get moving towards happiness.

Alena notes that people aren’t happy because they are “just spinning around” in their comfort zones, and also notes that it is hard to step out of one’s comfort zone and into unknown territory. She also comments that a lot of people are not used to being happy and mentioned Earl Nightingale’s quote, “Conformity is a disease,” pointing out that the conforming nature of one’s life - work, school and the like - has been inculcated into people since childhood. Alena then remarks that, when people suddenly have the opportunity to create their own lives, they want to get back to the comfort of conformity without figuring out what it is that they really want to do, which could lead to something better for them. She then remarked that, yes, going outside of one’s comfort zone might be scary, but it’s better than living with boredom and unhappiness and regret over things not done.

Alena commented that people don’t have to take a huge step out of their comfort zone right away, but can start with small steps, such as creating a list of ten things to be grateful for every day and then feeling positive things about each item on the list. Doing so, she notes, raises one’s vibration and enables one to move into one’s day in a positive state, and she then described how to further this by asking for guidance or peace from the Universe, then sending loving light into any situation or person bothering one. Alena then recommends doing three things, every day, which one likes to keep the momentum going, as well as looking up at the sky, which is ever changing, and being present to it. She notes that this results in one opening one’s mind to the goodness in the world, regardless of one’s circumstances, after which the opportunities to move on to happier circumstances will appear and get noticed.

Alena remarked that the tools she practiced in the book gave her clarity and enabled her to deal with the worst parts of her life by enabling her to differentiate what is “smoke” and what is real - the important things in one’s life and who one wants to be and where one wants to go. She noted that what goes on inside one’s self is how one perceives the world and comments that, where one’s journey to happiness is concerned, there is a tipping point when one’s life changes, when things start happening in one’s life due to being tuned to the frequencies at which such opportunities can come into one’s life. Alena then recommended an experiment by going into one’s work or day with a negative attitude and observe what happens, then going into one’s work or day the following day with a positive attitude and observe what happens.

Alena remarks that she has studied with some of the best and went full bore into being happy, and has applied this in the writing of her book, which not only gives its readers a starting point of where they are in their lives but which also shows why one’s mind works the way it does and how to change old beliefs, in a way that is easy to read and understand. To those who are in their prisons, Alena recommends that they take responsibility for making their day beautiful and then going from there to change their lives.

Alena’s landing page for her book is, and she can be reached at

Purchase from Amazon: The Prison Effect: Discover How You Are Blocking Your Own Happiness and Break Free to Abundance and Joy in Life by Alena Chapman

Friday, August 25, 2017

Mia Tomikawa of Happy Science Reveals the Cause and Answer to The Unhappiness Syndrome

Mia Tomikawa talks to Alexander “The Engineer” Lim, host of AuthorStory by about Master Ryuho Okawa’s book, The Unhappiness Syndrome: 28 Habits of Unhappy People (and How to Change Them).

 “Your words often reflect your thoughts.” ~Mia Tomikawa

Master Ryuho Okawa is a spiritual leader and international bestselling author whose goal is to help people find happiness and create a better world and has spent the past thirty years creating the Happy Science movement, which now has members all over the world. Mia herself became involved with Happy Science while she was living in Los Angeles, when she read some of Okawa’s books. She became a member of the movement then became a staff member, and among her present responsibilities are editing and publicizing Happy Science books. The Unhappiness Syndrome is for people who are unhappy, who unknowingly choose actions and thoughts that make them unhappy, but who still want to become happy themselves.

Unhappiness, according to Mia, is based on being unhappy with oneself and with everyone and everything in the world. She notes that attempting to to become happy by seeking this from other people or the environment does not make one truly happy, as one is not happy in the first place, and one of the major signs that indicate how unhappy someone is, is when he or she constantly blames others or the environment for the bad things that happen to them. Mia notes that unhappiness can be invited into one’s life, and that one who invites it can spread unhappiness to others. Events that can cause suffering does not necessarily cause unhappiness but can enable one to progress to enlightenment in the way that one handles that event.

Mia notes that the term “syndrome” refers more to one’s mental attitude and spiritual state, than referring to any disease itself. One method Mia recommends for changing one’s attitude is to see and assess oneself objectively, to become aware of the patterns of unhappiness, and gives a guideline for reviewing and writing down one’s thoughts and actions throughout the day, which would enable one to see the negative thoughts and actions throughout the day. Once these are recognized, one must then practice to replace these with more positive thoughts and actions, and Mia admits that this takes time, as doing so takes practice.

Mia notes that unhappy thoughts come from the desire to protect oneself from any hurtful events that have happened in one’s life and also notes that such unhappy thoughts actually wind up repeating the same pattern of hurt throughout one’s life. She notes that the first step in getting out of the rut is to spend less time immersed in negative thoughts, and the second step is to fill one’s mind with positive thoughts and be thankful for all the good that happens to oneself. She also recommends sitting and waiting for the bad times to pass and flow, to help oneself let go of any unhappiness - something which also takes practice.

Mia notes that The Unhappiness Syndrome, like other books of Ryuho Okawa, talks about spirituality rather than just deals with self-improvement, and this is what makes the book different from other self-help books. She also recommends that people rediscover their purpose in their life, the one they set for themselves before they were born, she says, to help guide them in achieving happiness.

Purchase from Amazon: The Unhappiness Syndrome: 28 Habits of Unhappy People (and How to Change Them) by Master Ryuho Okawa

Saturday, August 12, 2017

Steve Kardian on Teaching The New Superpower for Women (Trusting Their Intuition, Predicting Dangerous Situations and Defending Themselves from the Unthinkable)

Steve Kardian talks to Alexander “The Engineer” Lim, host of AuthorStory by about his book, The New Superpower for Women: Trust Your Intuition, Predict Dangerous Situations and Defend Yourself from the Unthinkable.

“Educate yourself, empower yourself.” ~Steve Kardian

Steve has had a career in law enforcement for thirty years, covering such beats as homicide, investigation, bribery, fraud and organized crime and has been teaching safety and personal defense as well. Steve’s main emphasis with self-defense and safety is to create instructors, traveling around the world and to various organizations, both civilian and military, to do so, and the book is based on his teachings on personal defense to women. Steve points out that self-defense is the last resort, and he works to empower women with the knowledge necessary to empower themselves, with such knowledge including social situations and creating a blueprint to react to crises.

Steve notes that, in the United States, one in five women will be violated during her lifetime, and while this statistic holds in colleges, he notes that less than five percent of the women who are so violated in college will ever report the incident to the police, because the college they attend prefer to protect their brand rather than their students.

Steve refers to the Grayston-Stein study of 1981, when cameras took footage of people on a New York city street over a period of time, and when the footage was shown to incarcerated criminals the latter consistently picked the same people as soft targets by taking note of such things as the latter’s gait, stride and posture, amongst others. He remarks that situational awareness is necessary to helping avert an attack, with intuition playing a big part. He also notes that walking properly is a deterrent, and that putting the potential attacker on notice, sometimes by simply almost looking right at him, reduces the chances of being attacked by around 70%. And if a criminal accosts a woman, her best option is to hold her hands up while stepping back and shout “Back off!” to attract the attention of everyone else around, thus raising the concern, in the criminal’s mind, of either getting hurt or getting caught, both of which are things he wants to avoid. He also notes that one should scan, giving the example of looking left and right when entering and leaving a building, as well as immediately ascertaining where the exits of a particular place are. He also recommends that people believe their eyes and ears to help them stay out of trouble, and avoid being in large crowds.

Stalking is a major concern, and Steve notes that, ten years ago, there were around a million incidents of stalking, whereas today there are seven to eight million stalking incidents, with the increase being due to the availability of the Internet. He notes that a lot of popular apps reveal the location of the owner of the smartphone, which enables such stalking, and to counter this Steve recommends turning off the location services in apps as well as the location services in photos, as these can be geo-tagged.

Steve remarks that a “blitz” is an attack that comes out of nowhere, and that it takes a half second to four seconds to figure out what is going on. Steve remarks that, when one’s heartbeat reaches 115 beats a minute, the fine motor skills diminish, and that a lot of techniques taught in martial arts break down at a range between 115 to 145 beats per minute. Above 145 beats per minute, only gross motor skills are left functioning, and it would be best to employ these during the time of actual conflict. Taking control of one’s responses relies upon creating and following a blueprint, which is a plan of action that can be put immediately in effect, as Steve notes that the adrenaline rush lasts only ten seconds, and after this an adrenal dump takes place and the person is then exhausted.

Steve remarks that there is only one chapter on self-defense in The New Superpower for Women, as he focuses on enabling women to deal with the predator and the survivor, which is something a lot of self-defense instructors have little practical knowledge of - practical knowledge which Steve, after thirty years of experience, has a lot of.

Steve remarks that creating a blueprint is key to surviving a crisis situation. The blueprint is essentially thinking through the steps one would need to take if one encountered a crisis situation, and the example Steve gave was that of someone alone in their apartment or dormitory, with someone trying to break in. He remarks that that person needs to take the time to visualize oneself taking the actions necessary, such as grabbing a cell phone, calling the police, getting to a safe place and physically securing it and giving out all of the detailed and specific instructions necessary for the police to get to one’s place.

Where weapons are concerned, Steve remarks that, if these are carried, one must become familiar with handling and using it.

Purchase from Amazon: The New Superpower for Women: Trust Your Intuition, Predict Dangerous Situations and Defend Yourself from the Unthinkable by Steve Kardian